Building Function Steps (2.5 Instructions)

Just like in the Call Script Builder you are familiar with, function steps help alter the flow of the script depending on the variables you’ve programmed in. Below are examples of the different function steps and what they do.

  • Date/Time Function: Date/Time functions alter the flow of the script depending on the day and/or time rules you’ve implemented. For example, implementing temporary changes during a holiday.
  • Comparison Function:Comparison functions help the system compare two or more variables. For example, checking a caller’s zip code to see if they are in a business’s service area. 
  • FieldNamePath Function: FieldNamePath function allows you to create two or more paths using the same steps with different closings. For example, gathering the same information for both new and existing customers, but having different Outcomes, or Call Results. 
  • Recording On/Off Function: RecordingOff/On functions allow you to automatically deactivate and reactivate call recording when sensitive information is being gathered during the call, e.g., credit card information, SSN, etc.

Date/Time Functions

While the Date/Time function still works the same way, the programming aspect is a bit different. Instead of using DateAfter: 01/01/2020 you will now need to use the following format:

Date/Time requires >, <, = symbols + {{Script.Date}}

  • {{Script.Date}}=03/03/2020 (e.g., script date is EQUAL to March 3rd)
  • {{Script.Time}}>12:00 AM (e.g., script time is AFTER 12:00 AM)
  • {{Script.Date}}<04/01/2020 (e.g., script date is BEFORE April 1st)
Note that DateTime is based off of your account's timezone, so you won't need to factor in any time changes.

If building a DateAfter/TimeAfter function, you will want to organize your variables in  ascending order (latest on bottom, earliest on top). If you were using DateIs/TimeIs functions, you would organize your variables in descending order (earliest on bottom, latest on top). 

Click on the Message icon on the operator greeting page to open up the step menu so you can get an overview of your path options, and what their Next Steps are. This tutorial will show you how to add a Date/Time Function right after the greeting. 

Under the Next column, take note of what step is currently listed, as we will need it later on. Then from the drop down select New Logic.

When you are ready to move on, click the Checkmark. Then, select the path you are working on from the initial drop down, and click the Forward arrow to continue.

You can wait to click Publish Changes until the end of making your updates. If you decide to Publish them along the way we recommend temporarily naming the path you are working on to Do Not Use. Otherwise, the operators will see an unfinished script path and will not be able to follow it. You will just need to remember to change it back to the regular path name afterwards!

On the next screen, click the Message icon and select  Default.

Now we can start creating our function Logic Option.

Start by adding a name. Since this is a DateAfter tutorial, we’ve named ours DateAfter. However, if you were working on a Time function, you’d want to name it accordingly (e.g., TimeAfter). 

Note that in the original Call Script Builder, you would have used Function(DateTime) here. However, in the 2.5 version, all functions are programmed with {{AutoSelect()}} in the Text field. 

Now let’s add our Logic Options. In this case we will create 3. One for how the CSR should be handling calls before the update, one that directs the CSR to temporary call handling, and the third that allows the script to go back to the original procedure. 

Click the blue + sign and start adding your options.

As you can see from the picture, if the script date is after April 5th, the script will go to  2. FirstNameSchedule as the next step. If the script date is after April 6th, our next step is 8. Outcome: Holiday Closing. If the script date is after April 7th, our next step will go back to 2. FirstNameSchedule.

Just like in the original Call Script Builder, you can customize your Next Steps as needed. 

If you wanted to build a DateIs/TimeIs you would follow the same steps outlined above, but your script variables would be {{Script.Date}}=04/05/2020 or {{Script.Time}}=8:00 PM as shown below. TimeAfter would be programmed as {{Script.Time}}>8:00 PM

Click the Checkmark and  Publish Changes

Comparison Functions

A comparison function requires the variable that you’re trying to compare with to equal what’s inputted by the CSR. (e.g., {{PropertyType}}=Apartment)

Click on the Message icon on the operator greeting page to open up the step menu so you can get an overview of your path options, and what their Next Steps are. This tutorial will show you how to add a Comparison Function right after the greeting. 

Under the Next column, take note of what step is currently listed, as we will need it later on. Then from the drop down select New Input.

Click the Checkmark to move on. 

On the next screen, click the Message icon next to New Input and choose Select. This will allow CSRs to choose from a list of options, like a Pick List.

When you are ready to move on, click the Checkmark. Then, select the path you are working on from the initial drop down, and click the Forward arrow to continue.

Next we want to add in our options. In this tutorial, we want to screen callers based off of what type of property they are calling in for. So, we’ll add our various property types as shown below.

Now in order to allow the script to weed through these particular property types and handle them accordingly, we need to add our Function Comparison via a Logic Option. So, as your Next Step, choose  New Logic

Click the Checkmark to continue.

Since we’ve already added our property types, we’ll need to customize our Logic Option next. So, click the  Message icon next to New Logic

You’ll want to choose  Default in the drop down.

Now we can start adding our different functions and how we want them handled. In our tutorial, we want all property types that do NOT equal “Apartment” to go to a Closing, or Outcome. 

In the top Text field, add {{AutoSelect()}} in the text box. Then, add your logic options using {{PropertyType}}= to help the system properly screen calls. 

Depending on the updates you are making, you may not use {{PropertyType}} but some other identifier, like {{ZipCode}} for example. 

When you are done, click the Checkmark and Publish Changes

FieldNamePath Functions

Click on the Message icon on the operator greeting page to open up the step menu so you can get an overview of your path options, and what their Next Steps are. This tutorial will show you how to add a FieldNamePath Function right after the greeting. 

Under the Next column, take note of what step is currently listed, as we will need it later on. Then from the drop down select New Logic.

When you are ready to move on, click the Checkmark. Then, select the path you are working on from the initial drop down, and click the Forward arrow to continue.

On the next screen, click the  Message icon next to New Logic and select Default from the dropdown.

Now we can start creating our function Logic Option.

Now, let’s fill out the text in our Logic Option. In this case, we’ll imagine the caller wants to schedule an ER appointment. We have 3 possible emergency issues, and we’ll have them all go to 2. FirstNameSchedule.

Remember, the FieldNamePath function allows us to collect the same information for 2 or more paths, but still have different closings. 

Click the Checkmark to continue.

Now, we will need to add our second Logic Option so that we can create our function. This will allow us to customize our Closings, or Outcomes. 

Locate the Regarding step, and click the Message icon to change the Next Step to a New Logic

Click the Checkmark to continue.  

Next fill in your Logic Option. This should be the same as your original Logic Option, except your Text box will include  {{AutoSelect()}} and your Outcomes will be different, as shown below.

Note that FieldNamePath does not require any special formatting other than {{AutoSelect()}}. You will use the exact same word in the 2nd  set of options as the 1st. (e.g., if logic option 1 is ERIssues, logic option 2 will also be ERIssues.)

Click the Checkmark and  Publish Changes. 

RecordingOff/On Functions

When you reach the step in the script where you want to pause recording, select  New Logic from the Next menu. Then, click the Checkmark.

Click the  Message icon next to New Logic and select Default from the dropdown. 

Name the step  PauseRecording, and enter {{AutoSelect()}} into the Text area. Then, click the plus sign below Text at the bottom left to add your outcome.

Under Text, type  {{Recording.Pause}}. Select your Next step, or create a New Input. Click the Checkmark to continue.

After the step for which you’ve turned off recording, add another New Logic step to turn recording back on.

Name the step  ResumeRecording, and enter {{AutoSelect()}} into the Text area. Click the plus sign below Text at the bottom left to add your outcome. Under Text, type {{Recording.Resume}}.

Select your Next step, or create a New Input. Click the Checkmark to continue.

Once you have completed your path, click  Publish Changes.

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